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alex kirby
08-01-2007, 06:56 AM
ive always wondered, are these boats on cables or are they totally independent? and what make size and horsepower are the engines, are they single or twin engined.

GusMan
08-01-2007, 08:01 AM
The watercraft used as a part of the Disney Transportation system are all free-floating vehicles. As for engine types, all are inboard motors of unknown size and power.

alex kirby
08-02-2007, 01:37 PM
Cheers

efoxx
08-02-2007, 06:19 PM
ferries have a single engine if prop wash is to be accounted for. two props one at each end for pushing in each direction. one bridge at each end. and yes they are free floating, I have seen what happens when a new driver miss judges his approach:eek:.

Chicago Wookiee
08-02-2007, 07:39 PM
When we were there in June they were training some new drivers. Odd thing was they did all the training on Bay Lake and not Seven Seas Lagoon. The experienced captain would get it through the water bridge while the Disney navy blocked all other traffic - then the new captain would take over and practice driving back and forth at the south end of Bay Lake.

alex kirby
08-03-2007, 03:50 AM
That makes sense one prop at each end, this will mean they must have 2x engines, can you imagine how many hours those engines must have done!

danyoung
08-03-2007, 09:57 AM
From what I've observed, the ferries are not on tracks of any kind. They run on a single engine which can pivot a full 360 degrees, allowing the ferry to rotate in position. Very cool for tight turnarounds in a small canal!

I plan on piloting them suckers when I retire in about 15 years, so I'll let you know . . .

efoxx
08-03-2007, 01:07 PM
That makes sense one prop at each end, this will mean they must have 2x engines, can you imagine how many hours those engines must have done!no only one engine, with multiple selections for prop power. but I don't believe they are steerable Danyoung otherwise they would have to be under propulsion to steer and I have seen them coasting and steering at the same time. that being said the flat bottomed keel less boats that they are can turn very sharp, and a good skipper who knows proper use of this boat can pivot it on a dime.

scottnj1966
08-03-2007, 01:12 PM
All the boats in the lakes are not on any kinda of cable or sensor grid.

Now the river boat in the mk is on a track.
So is the jungle cruise of course hahaha


http://www.bigfloridacountry.com/wdwwaterfleet.htm

danyoung
08-03-2007, 01:59 PM
efoxx, we're talking about 2 different things. The ferries on the Seven Seas Lagoon do have screws at each end. I think they have two at each end, but I could be wrong. From watching in the window of the cabin, most of the steering is by throttling up or down on left and right throttles (if that makes any sense).

What I was talking about above was the smaller friendship boats that run in Epcot and over to the Yacht & Beach, Boardwalk, and on over to D/MGM. These have one prop, totally steerable in 360 degrees. You can see them pushing off of their dock at Epcot and then basically pivoting in place for their return to the hotels. Very cool boats!

alex kirby
08-29-2007, 03:22 AM
From what I've observed, the ferries are not on tracks of any kind. They run on a single engine which can pivot a full 360 degrees, allowing the ferry to rotate in position. Very cool for tight turnarounds in a small canal!

I plan on piloting them suckers when I retire in about 15 years, so I'll let you know . . .

luky b@gger!!!

efoxx
08-29-2007, 01:30 PM
efoxx, we're talking about 2 different things. The ferries on the Seven Seas Lagoon do have screws at each end. I think they have two at each end, but I could be wrong. From watching in the window of the cabin, most of the steering is by throttling up or down on left and right throttles (if that makes any sense).

What I was talking about above was the smaller friendship boats that run in Epcot and over to the Yacht & Beach, Boardwalk, and on over to D/MGM. These have one prop, totally steerable in 360 degrees. You can see them pushing off of their dock at Epcot and then basically pivoting in place for their return to the hotels. Very cool boats!
OK we were talking about two different things.
Yes the friendship boats have a single jet (not prop) that rotates 360 which gives them a tremendous amount of maneuverability with a pilot who knows his stuff.

the ferries that cross 7 seas lagoon have a single engine, and a prop and single rudder at each end. (I have seen pictures of them dry docked) and are pretty standard for the ferries they represent.

danyoung
08-30-2007, 06:04 AM
...the ferries that cross 7 seas lagoon have a single engine, and a prop and single rudder at each end. (I have seen pictures of them dry docked) and are pretty standard for the ferries they represent.

Really? I haven't seen them drydocked myself, so I should defer to your info. But don't they have left and right throttle controls on the dual bridges? That would indicate 2 screws (and quite possibly 2 engines), not one. I could be wrong, but I'd swear that they steer by using these 2 throttles, not using a wheel or control for the rudder.

Have I mentioned I could be wrong???

Edited to add info from the website Bigbrian-nc.com -

All the ferryboat are powered by 2 Caterpiller liquid-cooled diesel engines model 3406, rated at 275 hp each, 893 cubic inches each.
Each spins a 36" diameter bronze propeller.
Each ferryboat has 2 air-cooled diesel powered generators. Fowler and Irvine- Palmers at 25 watts, the Potter- Katos at 50 watts.
Each ferryboat is controlled with two tiller levers, a bow and a stern. the stern tiller is used for steering, while the bow tiller is only used to position the bow while docking, a good pilot doesn't need to do this.

efoxx
08-30-2007, 12:29 PM
Edited to add info from the website Bigbrian-nc.com -

All the ferryboat are powered by 2 Caterpiller liquid-cooled diesel engines model 3406, rated at 275 hp each, 893 cubic inches each.
Each spins a 36" diameter bronze propeller.
Each ferryboat has 2 air-cooled diesel powered generators. Fowler and Irvine- Palmers at 25 watts, the Potter- Katos at 50 watts.
Each ferryboat is controlled with two tiller levers, a bow and a stern. the stern tiller is used for steering, while the bow tiller is only used to position the bow while docking, a good pilot doesn't need to do this.
this actually goes along with the photo's I've seen. (if I can locate one I will post it) one prop at each end with a single blade rudder behind it. I have seen skippers coast most of the way across the lagoon making numerous small directional changes without applying power.

danyoung
08-30-2007, 01:43 PM
I'd love to see a pic if you can find it. Learning is still fun for this old guy!