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Black Pearl
05-11-2005, 01:26 PM
I have Type 1 diabetes and recall hearing that you could drop off insulin at city hall to keep it refrigerated while at the park. Several people have told me that you can no longer do this. does anyone know for sure. Also, with syringes being a possible security issue, has anyone had a problem with bringing them in the park and maybe leaving those at city hall as well?

VickiC
05-11-2005, 01:28 PM
My diabetic uncle has an AP and has had no problem bringing his syringes in. He carries everything in a small insulated fanny pack.

DCAWhites
05-11-2005, 02:02 PM
It wouldnt be city hall that would hold medical stuff for you, but rather first aid at the end of main street on the right side. I believe they still do this.

AVP
05-11-2005, 02:18 PM
Central First Aid used to be the place to store medication, but I have also recently heard (but not confirmed) that they stopped doing this sometime last year.

My husband carried his medication, which had to be kept cold, in a little bag made especially for insulin, so you shouldn't have any problem finding a way to store it. He would stash his in a locker or in his backpack.

AVP

Hakuna Makarla
05-11-2005, 02:21 PM
you do know insulin does not have to referigerated right? use to be they said it did, now days your insuin is fine with out it. :)

MammaSilva
05-11-2005, 02:32 PM
Karla, if that is true then why does my mail in pharmacy still ship my husbands in an insulated foam ice chest with 'chemical ice' and overnight it. I'm not sure where you got this information but it's obviously not 100 percent correct, considering I JUST refilled my husbands prescription and the literature states, keep refrigerated.

SummerinFL
05-11-2005, 02:44 PM
you do know insulin does not have to referigerated right? use to be they said it did, now days your insuin is fine with out it. :)

My ex husband only kept fresh bottles refrigerated but he told me that room temp was fine after the first use. Then again he was an idiot so I don't know how reliable that is....:P

Black Pearl
05-11-2005, 02:47 PM
True, insulin being made from yeast does not have to be kept refridgerated like the old pork and beef stuff, but believe me, as a resident of the Valley of the Sun, (Phoenix), the suspension will go bad fast above 79 degrees. I dont know how much insulin I waste a year because of this. I was wondering if it wouldn't be too much trouble, if one of the APers here could maybe stop by first aid and see if they've stopped the practice of keeping insulin? Is there anumber maybe I can call?

D-lander 1956
05-11-2005, 02:57 PM
you do know insulin does not have to referigerated right? use to be they said it did, now days your insuin is fine with out it. :)

Sorry, that is not entirely true. While most insulins are synthetic, they still need to be under 65 degrees and out of light. If it is stored over 70 for any length of time or exposed to too much light, the suspension will be ineffective, so the fridge is the best storage for any insulin. I always carry mine in a small pouch with blue ice cubes, always stays cool and am never asked about it by security. ;)

Hakuna Makarla
05-11-2005, 03:00 PM
Karla, if that is true then why does my mail in pharmacy still ship my husbands in an insulated foam ice chest with 'chemical ice' and overnight it. I'm not sure where you got this information but it's obviously not 100 percent correct, considering I JUST refilled my husbands prescription and the literature states, keep refrigerated.

wow thanks Guys!! I got it from my pharmacy!! They told me not to worry about rifridgerating it. MY son was forever forgetting to come take it so the pharmacy told me he could just carry it or leave it out, that nothing will happen to it. I appreciate this in fo I will tell mom to as she leaves hers out always :rolleyes: Appreciate you guys, in keeping me right and on track! :)

Disneyphile
05-11-2005, 03:00 PM
Just called my honey (he's a pharmacy tech). Insulin DOES need refrigeration, however it will survive for a day without it. He suggests using an insulated bag, and it will be fine. :)

Mark Mywords
05-11-2005, 03:03 PM
Our 5 year old had ear-infection medicine that needed refrigeration when we went last year (mid June). The folks at central first aid (next to the Plaza Inn on the main street side) were extremely friendly and were able to keep the medicine cool for us. That was such a nice service, it's sad if they've stopped...

Hakuna Makarla
05-11-2005, 03:10 PM
Just called my honey (he's a pharmacy tech). Insulin DOES need refrigeration, however it will survive for a day without it. He suggests using an insulated bag, and it will be fine. :)

I called mom right away, I wanted her to know she needed to put the insulng back in the fridge. MAn I am so glad you guys are up to date and full of info. I am not sure why the pharmacist said you do not need to, :rolleyes:

Black Pearl
05-11-2005, 03:16 PM
Central First Aid used to be the place to store medication, but I have also recently heard (but not confirmed) that they stopped doing this sometime last year.

My husband carried his medication, which had to be kept cold, in a little bag made especially for insulin, so you shouldn't have any problem finding a way to store it. He would stash his in a locker or in his backpack.

AVP
Yeah, the story I was told by friends was there was a liability issue with putting different insulins (NPH, Humolog, regular, etc.), in the same refridgerator, even if properly marked.

AVP
05-11-2005, 03:27 PM
OK, I've just confirmed with CFA that yes, you may store medications there while you are visiting Disneyland, or at the counterpart in DCA if you are visiting that park.

AVP

Captain Carlos
05-11-2005, 03:29 PM
I have Type 1 diabetes and recall hearing that you could drop off insulin at city hall to keep it refrigerated while at the park. Several people have told me that you can no longer do this. does anyone know for sure. Also, with syringes being a possible security issue, has anyone had a problem with bringing them in the park and maybe leaving those at city hall as well?

My son has a severe peanut allergy, I carried an Epi Pen with me in the park - no problems whatsoever going through security.

-Teresa

Andrew
05-11-2005, 03:57 PM
Folks, this is a friendly note from your MousePad moderating staff:

MousePlanet/MousePad is not a substitute for professional medical advice. See your doctor.

Feel free to continue the discussion and share information. However, before you act on anything you read here, please get a professional opinion.

jennia
05-11-2005, 06:46 PM
I've been a diabetic for over 25 years. I always store extra insulin in the fridge but the vial I am using at room temp. This conversation made me do a little bit of online research and I found an article that specifically mentions that your body reacts **differently** to insulin at different temperatures. So before you make a drastic change to your insulin temperature PLEASE like AVP said, check with a medical professional!!!

Now to address the OP. I usually carry my glucometer, insulin and syringes with me in the park and this has never been a problem with security. I do carry some Blue Ice with the insulin on warmer days to make sure the insulin doesn't get too hot.

Disnerd
05-11-2005, 11:32 PM
The best thing I have found for carrying insulin is a thing from a company called Frio from Millennium products. You soak the inner sleave in cold water and it will keep your meds cool all day long. Works way better than blue ice and recharges by just soaking in water. I have been taking one of these to DL and WDW for several years. Also never keep your test strips next to blue ice or in the fridge. The temp will throw off your readings. And in closing I went to the CM 50th preview yesterday and CFA had no problems holding my glucose meter and meds as long as they are labeled with name, address, phone number.
http://www.frio.us.com/

D-lander 1956
05-12-2005, 08:17 AM
^^Thanks Disnerd for that link. Never seen that before. That would be great for those travel days on planes etc when your meds are out of refrigeration for a long stretch. :)