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lovindisney
07-24-2008, 05:47 PM
I was wondering if anyone knows how Disneyland knows if your child is under 3 and therefor free to get in? My son will be just over 3 and I'm wondering if I should try to pass him as 2 so we don't have to pay the $139 or do they ask for some kind of proof or something.

Bytebear
07-24-2008, 05:56 PM
It's pretty much the honor system. If your child does look older, they may ask the date of birth, but I wouldn't worry too much about it.

Malcon10t
07-24-2008, 05:56 PM
They trust you to be honest. My nephew turns 3 Aug 2. If he goes with us a week later, he will have a ticket. He will be 3.

They do on occasion ask the child how old he is. How old will he say? Or will you tell him "If they ask you, say you are 2."

If you can't afford it, perhaps staying off site will save you enough money to be able to afford to pay for the child.

lofosho
07-24-2008, 06:18 PM
My little sister is super tall (Shes 17 now, and 6'1 with shoes on (yes, she's a nationally ranked volleyball player)), and even when she was little. Our first trip to disneyland with her was a week before her third birthday, and she was tall enough to ride space mountain. My parents thought it was hilarious that she got in for free and still went on all the rides!

The problem with asking the kids their own age is it can go the other way too :) The four year old I babysit lovvves to tell everyone that he's 10.

DLmomof2
07-24-2008, 06:44 PM
I started paying for my kids tickets the moment that they turned 3. I think it is dishonest to lie about the age just to get in free.

Malcon10t
07-24-2008, 07:05 PM
The problem with asking the kids their own age is it can go the other way too :) The four year old I babysit lovvves to tell everyone that he's 10.My lil nephew tells everyone he is five. His brother is five, so he wants to be five. He also gets perturbed if you call him Spiderman and he isn't wearing his Spidy mask, cause then he is Peter Parker.....

dsnyredhead
07-24-2008, 08:18 PM
Our child knows he's four...but will answer all kinds of things when you ask him "how old are you?". He typically will say he's anywhere from 2-10.

HobbitFeet
07-24-2008, 08:22 PM
I was wondering if anyone knows how Disneyland knows if your child is under 3 and therefor free to get in? My son will be just over 3 and I'm wondering if I should try to pass him as 2 so we don't have to pay the $139 or do they ask for some kind of proof or something.

Honor system.

We had two visits to DLR when DS was 1 and then 2, so we were happy and proud to pay for his AP when he turned 3! It was a big celebration, that he was old enough to have a proper ticket. :D

yohomama212
07-24-2008, 08:22 PM
We bought DD her first AP on her 3rd bday. She knew she was three and by the time we got to the gates, the whole world did too, she was so excited!

Elizabeth

ChipmunkStar
07-24-2008, 08:37 PM
I think they hope the customer is honest enough to not teach their children to think it's OK to lie just to save some money (aka steal). I think that seems to be the general consensus around these parts, too.

And yes, they could ask for proof.

momuvseven
07-24-2008, 08:40 PM
Personally I have very small for their age children and could have got away with this lots of times and not just at DLR. The reason I don't is because I would be terrible embarrassed and disappointed if we got held up in line. We are so eager to get through the turnstile first thing in the morning. That first hour or two at DLR is golden and we can get on tons of rides without a wait and collect our fastpasses. No way do I want to be held up and have to explain that we fibbed or misunderstood the rules or whatever and then the whole family has to give up our primo front of the line turn at the turnstile that we staked out an hour before opening to go get in line at the ticket booths and buy the correct tickets. That would be a major bummer.

It is also very bad karma to lie about your kids, in front of your kids and at the Happiest Place on Earth. I have enough problems in life without risking bad karma coming back on me.

There is so much fun at DLR for any age and by the time my kids are paying for a child or adult ticket they have more than gotten their money's worth of free and good times.

Boo's Mommy
07-24-2008, 08:42 PM
Last year, we went the week before ds turned 3 to get in one last time before we had to pay for him. I couldn't for the life of me find his birth certificate to bring as proof. Fortunately they didn't ask, but my dd (who was 4 at the time) was more than happy to let everyone know that her baby brother is still a baby for another week. We went again a month afterwards and he became the proud owner of his very first Annual Pass!

sendkeys
07-24-2008, 08:44 PM
I remember being age 9(or maybe it was 12 back then) For a few years after the cut off date :P hehe

lovindisney
07-24-2008, 08:51 PM
Thanks for the replies. My child probably would say they are three if asked plus I would feel guilty for being dishonest about it.

MammaSilva
07-24-2008, 08:51 PM
I remember being age 9(or maybe it was 12 back then) For a few years after the cut off date :P hehe


Ok and this just totally proves the point that kids remember when you sanction lying for personal gain...thank you.

sendkeys
07-24-2008, 08:55 PM
Ok and this just totally proves the point that kids remember when you sanction lying for personal gain...thank you.

I wonder if it turned me in to a bad person because i would do it again haha

twindaddy
07-24-2008, 08:56 PM
I have a birth cert copy with me, you never know, because the twins will be in two weeks under the deadline.

I suppose you could sneak them in, and then steal some mustard packets, and cut in line saying you are catching up with a group...that would be a mouseplanet triple play! OH THE HUMANITY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

backsthepack
07-25-2008, 05:51 AM
I cannot imagine not telling the truth! Our son was very tall for his age, when we took him at 2.5 I was not prepared to prove he was under 3. Never dawned on me to take a copy of his birth certificate..but then again, without a photo to prove that is your kids birth certificate what real proof is that? Anyway, so when I budgeted for that trip that year I made sure I budgeted enough for a ticket for him just in case. I didn't want to create a scene or anything. But they never even questioned us.

But I wouldn't even think of trying to get away with something. People that do that sort of thing make me ill. It ruins trust for the rest of us. If a person cannot afford to go, then don't go.

Now he is counting down the days until he uses an adult ticket rather than a child ticket. Goofy kid.

lovindisney
07-25-2008, 07:34 AM
Please know that I didn't mean to upset anyone and I totally hear where all of you are coming from and completely understand what you are saying. As I said in my last post I will not be doing it because I would feel dishonest and guilty.

pixar
07-25-2008, 07:36 AM
I suppose you could sneak them in, and then steal some mustard packets, and cut in line saying you are catching up with a group...that would be a mouseplanet triple play! OH THE HUMANITY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

people actually steal mustard packets? :eek: :D

DangerMouse
07-25-2008, 07:46 AM
people actually steal mustard packets? :eek: :D
They go great on the saltine crackers I have to sneak into the parks because no outside food is allowed. . . :rolleyes: ;)

tonytone
07-25-2008, 08:09 AM
I have a question that is more an issue of technicality but could also be one of morality, depending on what the rules are--let's say you purchase a 5-day child PH ticket for your child who was 9 at the time the ticket was first used/activated...then turns 10 on the third day of usage. From a strictly-technical standpoint--should/is the child then required to pay (well actually, the parent will be the one responsible...not unless the child knows how to pay for him/herself--LOL) some pro-rated price for an adult PH ticket? Or does Disney even care if such a scenario presents itself?

And from a strictly-moral standpoint--how would you feel about having your just-turned-10 years old child using a child PH for the remainder of the ticket's validity?

Bytebear
07-25-2008, 09:00 AM
Oh, for heavens sake. Obviously the CMs, nor the company cares if you fudge a little on the age of your kid. Let them be 2 for another few months. I can't believe someone would be so nit picky to buy a three day park hopper and worry that on the third day, they are cheating the system. Disney doesn't care, and neither should you.

Now, if your kid has a 5 o'clock shadow, that's another story.

Drince88
07-25-2008, 09:12 AM
I believe the 'official' company line regarding birthdays during a trip, is that they can continue to use the lower priced/free admission for that trip. I've even heard that if you have partially used admission media from WDW from when you were a kid, you can do a straight-across trade to be able to enter the parks. I don't know how long ago DL had multi-day media that didn't expire, so that might apply there, as well, if you could find that old media.

daveywest
07-25-2008, 11:21 AM
My dad was notorious for fubbing our ages as we got older. I remember several trips where someone was suddenly up to two years younger. Mom finally read him the riot act when he started asking the kids to be in on the lie.